Migration Guide

Migrating to Rally 2.2.0

Semantics of on-error cli argument have changed

Starting with Rally 2.2.0 the behavior of on-error cli argument has changed.

The existing default value continue-on-non-fatal is now renamed to continue and will keep the same behavior as the older default, i.e. cause the benchmark to fail only on network connection errors. The abort value also continues to behave the same (abort as soon as any error happens), however, it can be made to behave like continue on the task level using the new task property ignore-response-error-level=non-fatal.

For more details see: cli option on-error and the task parameter ignore-response-error-level.

relative-time is removed

Note

This removal is only relevant if you have configured an Elasticsearch metrics store for Rally.

The deprecated metric relative-time has been dropped in Rally 2.2.0. Use relative-time-ms instead to retrieve the same metric but denoted in milliseconds instead of microseconds. We will reintroduce this property with new semantics in Rally 2.3.0. See below for an overview of the migration plan for this metric:

  • Rally 2.1.0: relative-time has been deprecated and Rally added a new field relative-time-ms which contains the relative time in milliseconds.
  • Rally 2.2.0: relative-time is dropped. Rally only populates the field relative-time-ms which contains the relative time in milliseconds.
  • Rally 2.3.0: relative-time will be reintroduced and contain the relative time in milliseconds. The field relative-time-ms will be deprecated.
  • Rally 2.4.0: relative-time-ms will be dropped.

race and info now require --track

Previously we deprecated the default --track value of geonames. As of Rally 2.2.0, this parameter is mandatory where applicable.

cluster-settings specified in the track are not honored

The deprecated challenge property cluster_settings is not honored anymore. Custom cluster settings should be set as follows:

  • Static cluster settings should be defined via rally-teams and the property additional_cluster_settings
  • Dynamic cluster settings should be defined via the put-settings operation

Migrating to Rally 2.1.0

relative-time is deprecated

Note

This deprecation is only relevant if you have configured an Elasticsearch metrics store for Rally.

The metric relative-time contains the relative time since Rally has started executing a task denoted in microseconds. All other time-based metrics like service time or latency are denoted in milliseconds and we will align this property over the coming minor releases as follows:

  • Rally 2.1.0: relative-time is deprecated and Rally adds a new field relative-time-ms which contains the relative time in milliseconds.
  • Rally 2.2.0: relative-time will be dropped. Rally only populates the field relative-time-ms which contains the relative time in milliseconds.
  • Rally 2.3.0: relative-time will be reintroduced and contain the relative time in milliseconds. The field relative-time-ms will be deprecated.
  • Rally 2.4.0: relative-time-ms will be dropped.

Throttling is active from the beginning

Previously Rally has issued the first request immediately regardless of the target throughput. With this release, Rally will defer the first request according to the target throughput and the scheduling policy. Together with a poisson schedule, this measure avoids coordination among clients that hit Elasticsearch at exactly the same time causing a large initial spike.

Custom bulk parameter sources need to provide a unit

Previously, Rally has implicitly used the unit docs for bulk operations. With this release, custom parameter sources for bulk operations need to provide also a unit property or benchmarks will fail with:

esrally.exceptions.DataError: Parameter source for operation 'bulk-index' did not provide the mandatory parameter 'unit'. Add it to your parameter source and try again.

Pipelines from-sources-complete and from-sources-skip-build are removed

The previously deprecated pipelines from-sources-complete and from-sources-skip-build have been removed. Specify --pipeline=from-sources instead.

Rally requires a subcommand

Previously a subcommand was optional when running a benchmark. With Rally 2.1.0 a subcommand is always required. So instead of invoking:

esrally --distribution-version=7.10.0

Invoke Rally with the race subcommand instead:

esrally race --distribution-version=7.10.0

Running without a track is deprecated

Previously Rally has implicitly chosen the geonames track as default when --track was not provided. We want users to make a conscious choice of the workload and not specifying the track explicitly is deprecated (to be removed in Rally 2.2.0). So instead of invoking:

esrally race --distribution-version=7.10.0

Invoke Rally with --track=geonames instead:

esrally race --distribution-version=7.10.0 --track=geonames

Migrating to Rally 2.0.4

Running without a subcommand is deprecated

Rally 2.0.4 will warn when invoked without subcommand. So instead of invoking:

esrally --distribution-version=7.10.0

Invoke Rally with the race subcommand instead:

esrally race --distribution-version=7.10.0

When Rally is invoked without a subcommand it will issue the following warning on the command line and in the log file:

[WARNING] Invoking Rally without a subcommand is deprecated and will be required with Rally 2.1.0. Specify the 'race' subcommand explicitly.

Migrating to Rally 2.0.3

Scheduler API has changed

With Rally 2.0.3, the scheduler API has changed. The existing API still works but is deprecated and will be removed in Rally 2.1.0:

  • Scheduler functions should be replaced by scheduler classes
  • The constructor for scheduler classes changes. Instead of receiving params, it receives the entire task and the precalculated target throughput.

Consider the following scheduler implemented as a function using the deprecated API. The target throughput is hardcoded to one operation per second:

def scheduler_function(current):
    return current + 1

This needs to be reimplemented as follows. We assume that the property target-throughput is now specified on the respective task instead of hard-coding it in the scheduler. Rally will calculate the correct target throughput and inject it into the scheduler class:

class SchedulerClass:
    def __init__(self, task, target_throughput):
        self.rate = 1 / target_throughput

    def next(self, current):
        return current + self.rate

Also schedulers that are implemented as a class using the deprecated API, need to be changed:

class MyScheduler:
    def __init__(self, params):
        # assume one client by default
        self.clients = params.get("clients", 1)
        target_throughput = params["target-throughput"] / self.clients
        self.rate = 1 / target_throughput

    def next(self, current):
        return current + self.rate

To use the new API introduced with Rally 2.0.3, this class needs to be changed as follows:

class MyScheduler:
    # target throughput is already calculated by Rally and is injected here
    # Additional parameters can be retrieved from the task if needed (task.params).
    def __init__(self, task, target_throughput):
        self.rate = 1 / target_throughput

    def next(self, current):
        return current + self.rate

For more details, please see the updated scheduler documentation.

bulk-size metrics property is dropped

Metrics records for bulk request don’t contain the bulk-size property anymore. Please use the weight property instead and consider the unit property to interpret the value.

–include-tasks and –exclude-tasks affect all operations

Prior to 2.0.3, administrative tasks (see operations documentation) were exempt from filtering and would run regardless of filtering. --include-tasks and --exclude-tasks flags now can affect all operations in a track. If you make use of include filters, it is advised to check that all desired operations are listed.

configure subcommand is dropped

Prior to Rally 2.0.3, Rally had to be configured initially using esrally configure. With Rally 2.0.3, Rally creates a default configuration automatically and users are encouraged to edit Rally’s configuration file themselves. Refer to the new configuration reference for the configurable properties.

Migrating to Rally 2.0.1

Pipelines from-sources-complete and from-sources-skip-build are deprecated

Rally 2.0.1 caches source artifacts automatically in ~/.rally/benchmarks/distributions/src. Therefore, it is not necessary anymore to explicitly skip the build with --pipeline=from-sources-skip-build. Specify --pipeline=from-sources instead. See the pipeline reference documentation for more details.

wait-for-recovery requires an index parameter

Previously, the wait-for-recovery operation checked all indices but with Rally 2.0.1 an index parameter is required and only that index (or index pattern) is checked.

Migrating to Rally 2.0.0

Minimum Python version is 3.8.0

Rally 2.0.0 requires Python 3.8.0. Check the updated installation instructions for more details.

JAVA_HOME and the bundled runtime JDK

Rally can optionally use the bundled runtime JDK by setting --runtime-jdk="bundled". This setting will use the JDK that is bundled with Elasticsearch and not honor any JAVA_HOME settings you may have set.

Meta-Data for queries are omitted

Rally 2.0.0 does not determine query meta-data anymore by default to reduce the risk of client-side bottlenecks. The following meta-data fields are affected:

  • hits
  • hits_relation
  • timed_out
  • took

If you still want to retrieve them (risking skewed results due to additional overhead), set the new property detailed-results to true for any operation of type search.

Runner API uses asyncio

In order to support more concurrent clients in the future, Rally is moving from a synchronous model to an asynchronous model internally. With Rally 2.0.0 all custom runners need to be implemented using async APIs and a new bool argument async_runner=True needs to be provided upon registration. Below is an example how to migrate a custom runner function.

A custom runner prior to Rally 2.0.0:

def percolate(es, params):
    es.percolate(
       index="queries",
       doc_type="content",
       body=params["body"]
    )

def register(registry):
    registry.register_runner("percolate", percolate)

With Rally 2.0.0, the implementation changes as follows:

async def percolate(es, params):
    await es.percolate(
            index="queries",
            doc_type="content",
            body=params["body"]
          )

def register(registry):
    registry.register_runner("percolate", percolate, async_runner=True)

Apply to the following changes for each custom runner:

  • Prefix the function signature with async.
  • Add an await keyword before each Elasticsearch API call.
  • Add async_runner=True as the last argument to the register_runner function.

For more details please refer to the updated documentation on custom runners.

trial-id and trial-timestamp are removed

Since Rally 1.4.0, Rally uses the properties race-id and race-timestamp when writing data to the Elasticsearch metrics store. The properties trial-id and trial-timestamp were populated but are removed in this release. Any visualizations that still rely on these properties need to be changed to the new ones.

Migrating to Rally 1.4.1

Document IDs are now padded with 0 instead of spaces

When Rally 1.4.1 generates document IDs, it will pad them with ‘0’ instead of ‘ ‘ - 0000000000 instead of ‘ 0’, etc. Elasticsearch has optimizations for numeric IDs, so observed performance in Elasticsearch should improve slightly.

Migrating to Rally 1.4.0

cluster-settings is deprecated in favor of the put-settings operation

Before Rally 1.4.0, cluster settings could be specified on the track with the cluster-settings property. This functionality is deprecated and you should set dynamic cluster settings via the new put-settings runner. Static settings should instead be set via --car-params.

Build logs are stored in Rally’s log directory

If you benchmark source builds of Elasticsearch, Rally has previously stored the build output log in a race-specific directory. With this release, Rally will store the most recent build log in /home/user/.rally/logs/build.log.

Index size and Total Written are not included in the command line report

Elasticsearch nodes are now managed independently of benchmark execution and thus all system metrics (“index size” and “total written”) may be determined after the command line report has been written. The corresponding metrics (final_index_size_bytes and disk_io_write_bytes) are still written to the Elasticsearch metrics store if one is configured.

Node details are omitted from race metadata

Before Rally 1.4.0, the file race.json contained node details (such as the number of cluster nodes or details about the nodes’ operating system version) if Rally provisioned the cluster. With this release, this information is now omitted. This change also applies to the indices rally-races* in case you have setup an Elasticsearch metrics store. We recommend to use user tags in case such information is important, e.g. for visualising results.

trial-id and trial-timestamp are deprecated

With Rally 1.4.0, Rally will use the properties race-id and race-timestamp when writing data to the Elasticsearch metrics store. The properties trial-id and trial-timestamp are still populated but will be removed in a future release. Any visualizations that rely on these properties should be changed to the new ones.

Custom Parameter Sources

With Rally 1.4.0, we have changed the API for custom parameter sources. The size() method is now deprecated and is instead replaced with a new property called infinite. If you have previously returned None in size(), infinite should be set to True, otherwise False. Also, we recommend to implement the property percent_completed as Rally might not be able to determine progress in some cases. See below for some examples.

Old:

class CustomFiniteParamSource:
    # ...
    def size():
        return calculate_size()

    def params():
        return next_parameters()

class CustomInfiniteParamSource:
    # ...
    def size():
        return None

    # ...

New:

class CustomFiniteParamSource:
    def __init__(self, track, params, **kwargs):
        self.infinite = False
        # to track progress
        self.current_invocation = 0

    # ...
    # Note that we have removed the size() method

    def params():
        self.current_invocation += 1
        return next_parameters()

    # Implementing this is optional but recommended for proper progress reports
    @property
    def percent_completed(self):
        # for demonstration purposes we use calculate_size() here
        # to determine the expected number of invocations. However, if
        # it is possible to determine this value upfront, it is best
        # to cache it in a field and just reuse the value
        return self.current_invocation / calculate_size()


class CustomInfiniteParamSource:
    def __init__(self, track, params, **kwargs):
        self.infinite = True
        # ...

    # ...
    # Note that we have removed the size() method
    # ...

Migrating to Rally 1.3.0

Races now stored by ID instead of timestamp

With Rally 1.3.0, Races will be stored by their Trial ID instead of their timestamp. This means that on disk, a given race will be found at benchmarks/races/62d1e928-48b0-4d07-9899-07b45d031566/ instead of benchmarks/races/2019-07-03-17-52-07

Laps feature removed

The --laps parameter and corresponding multi-run trial functionality has been removed from execution and reporting. If you need lap functionality, the following shell script can be used instead:

RALLY_LAPS=3

for lap in $(seq 1 ${RALLY_LAPS})
do
  esrally --pipeline=benchmark-only --user-tag lap:$lap
done

Migrating to Rally 1.2.1

CPU usage is not measured anymore

With Rally 1.2.1, CPU usage will neither be measured nor reported. We suggest to use system monitoring tools like mpstat, sar or Metricbeat to measure CPU usage instead.

Migrating to Rally 1.1.0

request-params in operations are passed as is and not serialized

With Rally 1.1.0 any operations supporting the optional request-params property will pass the structure as is without attempting to serialize values. Until now, request-params relied on parameters being supported by the Elasticsearch Python client API calls. This means that for example boolean type parameters should be specified as strings i.e. "true" or "false" rather than true/false.

Example

Using create-index before 1.1.0:

{
  "name": "create-all-indices",
  "operation-type": "create-index",
  "settings": {
    "index.number_of_shards": 1
  },
  "request-params": {
    "wait_for_active_shards": true
  }
}

Using create-index starting with 1.1.0:

{
  "name": "create-all-indices",
  "operation-type": "create-index",
  "settings": {
    "index.number_of_shards": 1
  },
  "request-params": {
    "wait_for_active_shards": "true"
  }
}

Migrating to Rally 1.0.1

Logs are not rotated

With Rally 1.0.1 we have disabled automatic rotation of logs by default because it can lead to race conditions due to Rally’s multi-process architecture. If you did not change the default out-of-the-box logging configuration, Rally will automatically fix your configuration. Otherwise, you need to replace all instances of logging.handlers.TimedRotatingFileHandler with logging.handlers.WatchedFileHandler to disable log rotation.

To rotate logs we recommend to use external tools like logrotate. See the following example as a starting point for your own logrotate configuration and ensure to replace the path /home/user/.rally/logs/rally.log with the proper one:

/home/user/.rally/logs/rally.log {
        # rotate daily
        daily
        # keep the last seven log files
        rotate 7
        # remove logs older than 14 days
        maxage 14
        # compress old logs ...
        compress
        # ... after moving them
        delaycompress
        # ignore missing log files
        missingok
        # don't attempt to rotate empty ones
        notifempty
}

Migrating to Rally 1.0.0

Handling of JDK versions

Previously the path to the JDK needed to be configured in Rally’s configuration file (~/.rally/rally.ini) but this is too inflexible given the increased JDK release cadence. In order to keep up, we define now the allowed runtime JDKs in rally-teams per Elasticsearch version.

To resolve the path to the appropriate JDK you need to define the environment variable JAVA_HOME on each targeted machine.

You can also set version-specific environment variables, e.g. JAVA7_HOME, JAVA8_HOME or JAVA10_HOME which will take precedence over JAVA_HOME.

Note

Rally will choose the highest appropriate JDK per Elasticsearch version. You can use --runtime-jdk to force a specific JDK version but the path will still be resolved according to the logic above.

Custom Parameter Sources

In Rally 0.10.0 we have deprecated some parameter names in custom parameter sources. In Rally 1.0.0, these deprecated names have been removed. Therefore you need to replace the following parameter names if you use them in custom parameter sources:

Operation type Old name New name
search use_request_cache cache
search request_params request-params
search items_per_page results-per-page
bulk action_metadata_present action-metadata-present
force-merge max_num_segments max-num-segments

In Rally 0.9.0 the signature of custom parameter sources has also changed. In Rally 1.0.0 we have removed the backwards compatibility layer so you need to change the signatures.

Old:

# for parameter sources implemented as functions
def custom_param_source(indices, params):

# for parameter sources implemented as classes
class CustomParamSource:
    def __init__(self, indices, params):

New:

# for parameter sources implemented as functions
def custom_param_source(track, params, **kwargs):

# for parameter sources implemented as classes
class CustomParamSource:
    def __init__(self, track, params, **kwargs):

You can use the property track.indices to access indices.

Migrating to Rally 0.11.0

Versioned teams

Note

You can skip this section if you do not create custom Rally teams.

We have introduced versioned team specifications and consequently the directory structure changes. All cars and plugins need to reside in a version-specific subdirectory now. Up to now the structure of a team repository was as follows:

.
├── cars
│   ├── 1gheap.ini
│   ├── 2gheap.ini
│   ├── defaults.ini
│   ├── ea
│   │   └── config
│   │       └── jvm.options
│   ├── ea.ini
│   └── vanilla
│       └── config
│           ├── elasticsearch.yml
│           ├── jvm.options
│           └── log4j2.properties
└── plugins
    ├── core-plugins.txt
    └── transport_nio
        ├── default
        │   └── config
        │       └── elasticsearch.yml
        └── transport.ini

Starting with Rally 0.11.0, Rally will look for a directory “v1” within cars and plugins. The files that should be copied to the Elasticsearch directory, need to be contained in a templates subdirectory. Therefore, the new structure is as follows:

.
├── cars
│   └── v1
│       ├── 1gheap.ini
│       ├── 2gheap.ini
│       ├── defaults.ini
│       ├── ea
│       │   └── templates
│       │       └── config
│       │           └── jvm.options
│       ├── ea.ini
│       └── vanilla
│           └── templates
│               └── config
│                   ├── elasticsearch.yml
│                   ├── jvm.options
│                   └── log4j2.properties
└── plugins
    └── v1
        ├── core-plugins.txt
        └── transport_nio
            ├── default
            │   └── templates
            │       └── config
            │           └── elasticsearch.yml
            └── transport.ini

It is also required that you create a file variables.ini for all your car config bases (optional for mixins). Therefore, the full directory structure is:

.
├── cars
│   └── v1
│       ├── 1gheap.ini
│       ├── 2gheap.ini
│       ├── defaults.ini
│       ├── ea
│       │   └── templates
│       │       └── config
│       │           └── jvm.options
│       ├── ea.ini
│       └── vanilla
│           ├── config.ini
│           └── templates
│               └── config
│                   ├── elasticsearch.yml
│                   ├── jvm.options
│                   └── log4j2.properties
└── plugins
    └── v1
        ├── core-plugins.txt
        └── transport_nio
            ├── default
            │   └── templates
            │       └── config
            │           └── elasticsearch.yml
            └── transport.ini

For distribution-based builds, config.ini file needs to contain a section variables and a release_url property:

[variables]
release_url=https://artifacts.elastic.co/downloads/elasticsearch/elasticsearch-oss-{{VERSION}}.tar.gz

Migrating to Rally 0.10.0

Removal of auto-detection and dependency on Gradle

We have removed the auto-detection and dependency on Gradle, required until now to build from source, in favor of the Gradle Wrapper which is present in the Elasticsearch repository for all branches >= 5.0.0.

Use full build command in plugin configuration

With Rally 0.10.0 we have removed the property build.task for plugin definitions, in the source section of the Rally configuration file. Instead, a new property build.command has been introduced where the full build command needs to be supplied.

The earlier syntax, to build a hypothetical plugin called my-plugin alongside Elasticsearch, required:

plugin.my-plugin.build.task = :my-plugin:plugin:assemble

This needs to be changed to the full command:

plugin.my-plugin.build.command = ./gradlew :my-plugin:plugin:assemble

Note that if you are configuring Plugins based on a released Elasticsearch version the command specified in build.command will be executed from the plugins root directory. It’s likely this directory won’t have the Gradle Wrapper so you’ll need to specify the full path to a Gradle command e.g.:

plugin.my-plugin.build.command = /usr/local/bin/gradle :my-plugin:plugin:assemble

Check Building plugins from sources for more information.

Removal of operation type index

We have removed the operation type index which has been deprecated with Rally 0.8.0. Use bulk instead as operation type.

Removal of the command line parameter --cluster-health

We have removed the command line parameter --cluster-health which has been deprecated with Rally 0.8.0. When using Rally’s standard tracks, specify the expected cluster health as a track parameter instead, e.g.: --track-params="cluster_health:'yellow'".

Removal of index-automanagement

We have removed the possibility that Rally automatically deletes and creates indices. Therefore, you need to add the following definitions explicitly at the beginning of a schedule if you want Rally to create declared indices:

"schedule": [
  {
    "operation": "delete-index"
  },
  {
    "operation": {
      "operation-type": "create-index",
      "settings": {
        "index.number_of_replicas": 0
      }
    }
  },
  {
    "operation": {
      "operation-type": "cluster-health",
      "request-params": {
        "wait_for_status": "green"
      }
    }
  }

The example above also shows how to provide per-challenge index settings. If per-challenge index settings are not required, you can just specify them in the index definition file.

This behavior applies similarly to index templates as well.

Custom Parameter Sources

We have aligned the internal names between parameter sources and runners with the ones that are specified by the user in the track file. If you have implemented custom parameter sources or runners, adjust the parameter names as follows:

Operation type Old name New name
search use_request_cache cache
search request_params request-params
search items_per_page results-per-page
bulk action_metadata_present action-metadata-present
force-merge max_num_segments max-num-segments

Migrating to Rally 0.9.0

Track Syntax

With Rally 0.9.0, we have changed the track file format. While the previous format is still supported with deprecation warnings, we recommend that you adapt your tracks as we will remove the deprecated syntax with the next minor release.

Below is an example of a track with the previous syntax:

{
  "description": "Tutorial benchmark for Rally",
  "data-url": "http://benchmarks.elasticsearch.org.s3.amazonaws.com/corpora/geonames",
  "indices": [
    {
      "name": "geonames",
      "types": [
        {
          "name": "type",
          "mapping": "mappings.json",
          "documents": "documents.json",
          "document-count": 8647880,
          "uncompressed-bytes": 2790927196
        }
      ]
    }
  ],
  "challenge": {
    "name": "index-only",
    "index-settings": {
      "index.number_of_replicas": 0
    },
    "schedule": [
      {
        "operation": {
          "operation-type": "bulk",
          "bulk-size": 5000
        },
        "warmup-time-period": 120,
        "clients": 8
      }
    ]
  }
}

Before Rally 0.9.0, indices have been created implicitly. We will remove this ability and thus you need to tell Rally explicitly that you want to create indices. With Rally 0.9.0 your track should look as follows:

{
  "description": "Tutorial benchmark for Rally",
  "indices": [
    {
      "name": "geonames",
      "body": "index.json",
      "auto-managed": false,
      "types": [ "type" ]
    }
  ],
  "corpora": [
    {
      "name": "geonames",
      "documents": [
        {
          "base-url": "http://benchmarks.elasticsearch.org.s3.amazonaws.com/corpora/geonames",
          "source-file": "documents.json",
          "document-count": 8647880,
          "uncompressed-bytes": 2790927196
        }
      ]
    }
  ],
  "challenge": {
    "name": "index-only",
    "schedule": [
      {
        "operation": "delete-index"
      },
      {
        "operation": {
          "operation-type": "create-index",
          "settings": {
            "index.number_of_replicas": 0
          }
        }
      },
      {
        "operation": {
          "operation-type": "cluster-health",
          "request-params": {
            "wait_for_status": "green"
          }
        }
      },
      {
        "operation": {
          "operation-type": "bulk",
          "bulk-size": 5000
        },
        "warmup-time-period": 120,
        "clients": 8
      }
    ]
  }
}

Let’s go through the necessary changes one by one.

Define the document corpus separately

Previously you had to define the document corpus together with the document type. In order to allow you to reuse existing document corpora across tracks, you now need to specify any document corpora separately:

"corpora": [
  {
    "name": "geonames",
    "documents": [
      {
        "base-url": "http://benchmarks.elasticsearch.org.s3.amazonaws.com/corpora/geonames",
        "source-file": "documents.json",
        "document-count": 8647880,
        "uncompressed-bytes": 2790927196
      }
    ]
  }
]

Note that this is just a simple example that should cover the most basic case. Be sure to check the track reference for all details.

Change the index definition

The new index definition now looks as follows:

{
  "name": "geonames",
  "body": "index.json",
  "auto-managed": false,
  "types": [ "type" ]
}

We have added a body property to the index and removed the mapping property from the type. In fact, the only information that we need about the document type is its name, hence it is now a simple list of strings. Just put all type mappings now into the mappings property of the index definition; see also the create index API documentation.

Secondly, we have disabled index auto-management by setting auto-managed to false. This allows us to define explicit tasks below to manage our index. Note that index auto-management is still working in Rally 0.9.0 but it will be removed with the next minor release Rally 0.10.0.

Explicitly delete and recreate the index

We have also added three tasks at the beginning of the schedule:

{
  "operation": "delete-index"
},
{
  "operation": {
    "operation-type": "create-index",
    "settings": {
      "index.number_of_replicas": 0
    }
  }
},
{
  "operation": {
    "operation-type": "cluster-health",
    "request-params": {
      "wait_for_status": "green"
    }
  }
}

These tasks represent what Rally previously did implicitly.

The first task will delete all indices that have been declared in the indices section if they existed previously. This ensures that we don’t have any leftovers from previous benchmarks.

After that we will create all indices that have been declared in the indices section. Note that we have also removed the special property index-settings and moved it to the settings parameter of create-index. Rally will merge any settings from the index body definition with these settings. This means you should define settings that are always the same in the index body and settings that change from challenge to challenge in the settings property.

Finally, Rally will check that the cluster health is green. If you want to be able to override the cluster health check parameters from the command line, you can leverage Rally’s track parameter feature:

{
  "operation": {
    "operation-type": "cluster-health",
    "request-params": {
      "wait_for_status": "{{ cluster_health|default('green') }}"
    }
  }
}

If you don’t specify anything on the command line, Rally will use the default value but you can e.g. specify --track-params="cluster_health:'yellow'" so Rally will check for (at least) a yellow cluster health status.

Note that you can customize these operations.

Custom Parameter Sources

With Rally 0.9.0, the API for custom parameter sources has changed. Previously, the following syntax was valid:

# for parameter sources implemented as functions
def custom_param_source(indices, params):

# for parameter sources implemented as classes
class CustomParamSource:
    def __init__(self, indices, params):

With Rally 0.9.0, the signatures need to be changed to:

# for parameter sources implemented as functions
def custom_param_source(track, params, **kwargs):

# for parameter sources implemented as classes
class CustomParamSource:
    def __init__(self, track, params, **kwargs):

Rally will issue a warning along the lines of Parameter source 'custom_param_source' is using deprecated method signature if your track is affected. If you need access to the indices list, you can call track.indices to retrieve it from the track.